Sunday, 27 September 2009

Mounting Pastel Artwork


As things have got a bit tight with my work lately, John helped out on Saturday, cutting my mount card and paper overlays, while I caught up on my admin (what a star).

It's very tedious and easy to muck up. Card sheets must be measured and cut for each piece of artwork, about 15mm bigger than the drawing all round (too big and the final package is larger than necessary, and we don't want to tempt Fate's parcel-bending fingers).


Then paper sheets are cut just slightly smaller: overlays for each mount, to protect the pastel surface.

It was this job I had in mind when I designed my 'island' in the centre of the studio:


In my previous studio, cutting mounts involved balancing acts with the cutting board, and pixie-style tip-toeing over various piles of card and paper laid out all over the floor and teetering on every surface. Thank goodness it's easier now, as I think John's pixie days are behind him...

7 comments:

costanza said...

รจ un bellissimo tavolo da lavoro

Damian Harvey said...

beautiful indeed - in fact, you're whole studio is great. I can't really complain though. Well, not when I get heating and lighting in the shed.

Lynne Chapman said...

I have this lovely, Dickensian image of you huddled over a desk, swaddled in your coat and scarf, scribbling away by the meagre light of a gas lamp...

Damian Harvey said...

Gas lamp and scarf! I can only dream of such luxury... to be honest, I'm enjoying working out here. Though I really will need electricity in here soon.

Lynne Chapman said...

Yes, it's starting to get chilly - we can't have your writing going all wiggly with the shivers!

Emily said...

What a wonderful and multifunctional island! I've been considering bespoke furniture lately and this inspired me to not let the idea go.

Lynne Chapman said...

It's worked fantastically. You don't have to buy anything fancy either - I bought some cheap, cut-price, end of line kitchen cabinets, just from Wickes I think, and topped them off with a piece of thick MDF, simply painted with Hammerite, to make it tough and impervious.